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As if Western New York hasn't endured enough this week.

Looks like we won't be hosting a Super Bowl.

(Insert sad foghorn sound here.)

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell sat down Tuesday night for a lengthy interview with former Associated Press White House correspondent Ben Feller at the 92nd St. YMCA in New York.

Questions dealt with head injuries, expanding the playoffs, the viability of London and Los Angeles as future NFL markets and, given our recent winter-weather problems, the upcoming Super Bowl outside at the Meadowlands.

Feller asked if the Super Bowl goes well in New Jersey, then could we see a Super Bowl in Buffalo?

The crowd erupted in laughter.

Goodell answered diplomatically.

"This is obviously innovative, and I think it's going to be something new," Goodell replied. "But it's also unique because we're in New York, and this is a stage.

"Every city can't host a Super Bowl just because of the sheer enormity of this event. It's not just a football game. We have a week full of events, and we'll probably have well over 150,000 people coming into the New York region for this event. They won’t all be at the stadium, even though they will all say they were at the stadium. They'll want to be here just to be part of the Super Bowl.

"That's why we start with 30,000 hotel rooms and a stadium that has to hold 70,000 people. The infrastructure for all those events -- not every city can probably handle that kind of thing. So our options are limited.

"Will we look at other cities that are in cold-weather sites? I think we'll make that evaluation later."

For the record, Ralph Wilson Stadium's capacity for this year was 72,498, ranking 11th out of the NFL's 31 venues. Renovations throughout the offseason will change that number a bit.

MetLife Stadium, where the Jets and Giants play, will hold 82,500 for the Super Bowl.

Oh, and it's near New York City.

Western New York's lack of hotel rooms has prevented the NHL from holding its All-Star Game here. And the accommodations we do have are generally derided by out-of-town athletes, as Tom Brady did two years ago, for regular-season games.

Now imagine the idea of a Super Bowl in Orchard Park.

Now let it go.